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Sports Hochi: Lotte preparing 3-year extension for Tadahito Iguchi

by on Sep.13, 2011 @ 2:33 pm, under NPB

According to Sports Hochi, the Chiba Lotte Marines could be preparing a 3-year extension for 36-year-old Tadahito Iguchi.  Lotte likes Iguchi's leadership abilities and feels he's still capable of producing.

Iguchi is in the final year of a 3-year deal.  Full-on negotiations likely won't take place until after the end of the season.

UPDATE @ 2:49pm - Sponichi is also carrying a report on this.

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Careers Stats

Year Team G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR TB RBI SB CS SH SF BB HBP SO GIDP AVG OBP SLG OPS
1997 DAI 76 252 217 31 44 6 3 8 80 23 3 3 2 1 24 8 67 4 .203 .304 .369 .674
1998 DAI 135 476 421 58 93 18 4 21 182 66 12 6 15 4 28 8 121 6 .221 .280 .432 .715
1999 DAI 116 424 370 38 83 15 1 14 142 47 14 7 4 3 38 9 113 13 .224 .310 .384 .696
2000 DAI 54 185 162 21 40 9 2 7 74 23 5 2 5 1 15 2 29 5 .247 .317 .457 .775
2001 DAI 140 636 552 104 144 26 1 30 262 97 44 9 9 2 61 12 117 14 .261 .346 .475 .822
2002 DAI 114 472 428 64 111 14 1 18 181 53 21 7 5 2 27 10 84 8 .259 .317 .423 .741
2003 DAI 135 617 515 112 175 37 1 27 295 109 42 6 1 6 81 14 81 10 .340 .438 .573 1.015
2004 DAI 124 574 510 96 170 34 2 24 280 89 18 5 0 8 47 9 90 14 .333 .394 .549 .948
2009 LOT 123 530 448 71 126 24 3 19 213 65 4 4 0 1 68 13 101 11 .281 .391 .475 .867
2010 LOT 143 650 531 88 156 44 1 17 253 103 2 1 0 7 98 14 114 13 .294 .412 .476 .893
2011 LOT 115 494 414 39 105 16 2 5 140 58 1 1 0 6 67 7 82 9 .254 .362 .338 .705
Totals 1275 5310 4568 722 1247 243 21 190 2102 733 166 51 41 41 554 106 999 107 .273 .362 .460 .825

10 comments on “Sports Hochi: Lotte preparing 3-year extension for Tadahito Iguchi

  1. Mike DeJong

    It’s so interesting in Japan to see how Japanese guys like Iguchi are rewarded for crappy seasons, yet foreign guys like Sledge and Harper are likely dumped after posting respectable numbers.

    Will the Japanese game ever be free of racial prejudice?

    1. EJH

      I realize America is currently in a “post-racial” period, so, of course, the constant media and fan criticism of Japanese players such as Matsuzaka has nothing at all to do with racism. They are treated just as reasonably and fairly as white American players.

      By the way, I am not sure how familiar you are with the Japanese league, but I think you ought to know that dumping good players, foreign or not, is not a league-wide phenomenon. It is a Yokohama speciality. They are actually a minor league team kept on the Central League schedule in order to help pad the stats of Yomiuri players.

    2. Gen Post author

      “They are actually a minor league team kept on the Central League schedule in order to help pad the stats of Yomiuri players.”

      Didn’t work out quite so well for the Giants tonight… ;)

    3. Steve

      What does Iguchi have to do with Harper and Sledge? Not the same team, not the same league. Last I checked nobody blamed the Diamondbacks for the Kei Igawa situation.

      Do we have to look for racism in every situation?

  2. fighting ham

    When Marty Brown, the last foreign manager in the NPB, left last year, I read some American media mildly accused the NPB of racism. Seriously, I am waiting for a day when an MLB team hires a manager who needs a translator.

    For those who don’t read Japanese, the Sponichi article openly says Iguchi is being considered a future manager, which everyone knew when he returned from the MLB and signed with Lotte.

    As for Harper, consider the fact that Whitesell has a high OPS and still gets benched. Harper may have a higher OPS than, say, yesterday’s Giant first baseman, Kamei, but his numbers aren’t that respectable considering he is so slow and offers no flexibility.

    As for Sledge, he makes much more money and the BayStars are looking for a new company.

  3. Gen Post author

    The other thing to remember is that foreign players are essentially “hired guns.” That is, there’s lots of performance expectations but little in terms of seeing them stick around with the team over a long period of time.

    The Alex Ramirez’s, Terrmel Sledge’s, and Alex Cabrera’s of the NPB world are the exception, not necessarily the rule when it comes to foreign players. Most players leave after a couple of years because they want one more shot at the Majors (and can you blame them?). I’m guessing foreign players don’t come to Japan with ideas of finishing out the rest careers here, regardless of how much they actually might like playing here (or how well they play here).

    There’s also a fairly consistent supply of players that are willing to come over here for a shot at becoming the next Colby Lewis or Ryan Vogelsong (while getting paid better money than they’ll make in the minors in the US). That means there really isn’t a need to stick to one player, especially if you have deep pockets. And if you’re the Dragons, you get creative and look for raw (cheap and easy to control) talent in countries other than the US, like the Dominican Republic (Tony Blanco, Felix Carrasco, Candido Jesus, Joel Guzman).

    Foreign players are also given a lot of leeway — they aren’t always forced to practice as hard or as often as the Japanese players, they don’t have to take part in all team functions…

    In the end, it’s not really the kind of environment that fosters long term loyalties in either direction.

    1. Gen Post author

      I think that stuff (having a shot at coach and ultimately managing once he retires) was written into his original contract.

      The Marines threw in a whole bunch of stuff in that first contract they signed with Iguchi.

  4. Kyle

    I do remember reading that about the first one. Still, this is a little perplexing to me. I guess he can DH? Its talked about a lot, but he doesn’t exactly appear to be in tip top shape these days!

    As far as the racism, I never experienced anything, but politeness in Sendai, Tokyo Dome, or in Yokohama (the only three venues I visited)while sitting in the audience. In fact, as my Japanese was still a work in progress, and still is, many people were quite helpful to me. I can’t wait to make it back!

    As for the American players, I feel like the relationship is pretty mutual in that they rarely become long term. The Japanese teams see that as hired guns, and the Americans see this as a way to work their way back to the Majors.

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